Rumored details on the upcoming iPad pro

The rumors surrounding the next Apple iPad pro are coming in thick, with people speculating that this will be one of its thinnest devices yet, measuring in at just 5.9mm thick (possibly 5.86mm?), with no headphone jack.

 

 

This device would be the smaller of the two 2018 iPad Pro models expected, with the smaller iPad Pro hitting 7 inches wide (178.52mm) and 9.7 inches tall, while the larger model will be 8.5 inches wide and 11 inches tall.

 

Other purported updates include slimmer bezels all the way around with no Home button, the top bezel housing a TrueDepth camera system for Face ID, as well as a smart connector on the back of the tablets,  a USB-C port instead of a Lightning port, a faster A12X chip, and support for a second-generation Apple Pencil.

 

Invites should be going out soon to media for the Special Event, which is expected to be at the end of this month.

Apple to donate 1000 Apple Watches

Apple is donating 1,000 Apple Watches to a study conducted by The University of North Carolina’s medical school which aims to track biological changes in people with eating disorders.

 

The new study is called BEGIN (AKA Binge Eating Genetics Initiative), and the goal is to better understand overeating disorders. The study will engage 1,000 participants of ages 18 or older who have experience with either binge eating disorder or bulimia nervosa.

 

Each participant will get a free Apple Watch which will collect data that the researchers will use to monitor their heart rate to see if there are any spikes prior to binge eating episodes.

 

Participants will receive tests to analyze their genetics and bodily bacteria and also have access to a mobile app called Recovery Record, which they can use to log their thoughts and feelings, which would be shared with a healthcare professional.

 

From the Sauce, Cynthia Bulik, founding director of the Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders and author of Binge Control: A Compact Recovery Guide:

 

“We need to collect data from a whole lot of people to see what it looks like,” said . “We want to know if it has a biological and behavioral signature.”

 

Researchers hope the collected data will help them to predict binge eating episodes before they happen. If this was to happen, a follow up study could be put in place whereby participants received some kind of alert when they were at risk of binge eating.